Water Reclamation Department
1600 Minutemen Causeway
P.O.Box 322430
Cocoa Beach, FL 32932-2430
Phone: (321) 868-3228
FAX: (321) 868-3323
waterreclamation@cityofcocoabeach.com

To conserve our water resources, in 1979 Cocoa Beach built a modern wastewater treatment plant. With technological advances over the years, the facility has become one of the finest and most versatile systems for treating wastewater in Florida.

 

The Cocoa Beach Water Reclamation plant, an award-wining facility,  is designed to treat up to 6 million gallons of wastewater per day (mgd). The plant utilizes a biological nutrient removal system combined with modern techniques for handling sludge (bio-solids).

 

As an offshoot of the wastewater treatment plant, the city operates the largest effluent spray irrigation system in Brevard County which serves all city residents. This reclaimed water system is the primary effluent disposal mechanism for the city. Other elements of this system include enclosed storage tanks and high pressure pumps. The city now has storage capacity for 20 million gallons of treated effluent.

 

The reuse distribution system has been extended beyond the city limits to Patrick Air Force Base, about eight miles south. Patrick AFB will require treatment of about 1.3 mgd of wastewater and then reuse a portion of reclaimed water for golf course and base housing grounds irrigation.  There are other benefits as well, as a result of special arrangements with FPL and the community of Cape Canaveral.

 

Cocoa Beach has installed a special stand-by generator at its wastewater treatment plant. In a period of peak power demand, FPL, with a simple phone call, can activate the generator to provide electrical power to the facility and reduce the demand on the utility's strained power capacity. Since this option is available to FPL, the Cocoa Beach plant realizes significant power savings through a lower cost per kilowatt hour.

 

By providing this kind of backup in a high demand situation, the city is able to continue its wastewater processing while helping FPL avoid area-wide outages. And Cocoa Beach is helping Cape Canaveral and Patrick AFB comply with the Indian River Lagoon Act of 1990.

 

In an inter-local agreement with Cape Canaveral, the Cocoa Beach treatment facility takes some of the Cape's excess treated effluent, up to 750,000 gpd, combines it with reclaimed wastewater from the Cocoa Beach plant and stores it in a 5-million-gallon tank. The distribution system then supplies customers in the north part of the city with reclaimed water for spray irrigation.

 

The Cocoa Beach wastewater recycling system has benefited our city's water conservation/resource management programs in a number of ways. Since 1979, approximately $17 million has been invested to achieve virtually zero effluent discharge into the nearby Banana River ecosystem in compliance with the Indian River Lagoon Act. Future plans call for making reuse water available to all Cocoa Beach households.

 

This will approximate 4.3 mgd of effluent disposal via spray irrigation. This usage will demand less of the potable and ground water supplies and create a positive recharge to the aquifer. Studies show that customers on reuse save approximately 2,000 gallons of potable water per month after connecting to the reclaimed water system.

 

An immediate and obvious benefit to Cocoa Beach homeowners of converting to the city's reclaimed water system, is the use of this nutrient-rich resource for a minimum monthly fee, to irrigate lawns and landscaping for maximum greening and beautification. 

 

Because reclaimed water is itself a valuable resource, customers on the city's reuse system are urged to use treated water prudently.

 

In a very real sense, hooking up to the water reuse system allows citizens to become practicing conservationists of an important natural resource.

 


Sewer Service Fees

 

The monthly sewer service charges vary with the level of potable water consumption and location of property (inside or outside the City of Cocoa Beach city limits).

 

  


Sewer Service Hookup Fees

 

Fees for newly constructed buildings or residences to get sewer hook-up:

 

 

Type of service required

Within City Limit

Outside City

Single family dwelling, condo or multi-dwelling residential $2200 / unit $3300 / unit

Motel / Hotel with kitchen facilities

$1500 / unit

$2250 / unit

Motel / Hotel without kitchen facilities

$1300 / unit

$1950/ unit

Laundromat (commercial, resort or motel / hotel)

$2200 / machine

$3300 / unit

Restaurant, lounge, cafe with food service

$150 per seat*

$225 / per seat*

Cocktail lounge, bar without food service

$100 per seat*

$150 per seat*

* seating calculated as one seat per 15 square feet

 

 

 

Deposit Info:

RESIDENTIAL DEPOSIT INFORMATION

City service area

County service area

Sewer

$ 60.00

$ 80.00

Reuse

$ 20.00

Not applicable

Garbage

$ 25.00

Not applicable

Stormwater

$ 10.00

Not applicable

 

MULTI-FAMILY UNITS DEPOSIT INFORMATION

City service area

County service area

Sewer

Two (2) months average sewer charges (see below)

Two (2) months average sewer charges (see below)

Reuse

Number of units multiplied by $ 20.00

Not applicable

Garbage

Number of units multiplied by service rate multiplied by 2

Not applicable

Stormwater

Number of units multiplied by rate multiplied by 2

Not applicable


COMMERCIAL DEPOSIT INFORMATION

City service area

County service area

Sewer

Two (2) months average sewer charges (see below)

Two (2) months average sewer charges (see below)

Reuse

Number of units multiplied by $ 20.00

Not applicable

Garbage

Service rate multiplied by 2

Not applicable

Stormwater

Number of ERUs multiplied by service rate multiplied by 2

Not applicable


POOL FILLS:

 

A one time pool fill or fill after repair will be granted during an eleven (11) month period, only if the billed rate of metered (potable) water consumption for the given month of repair or fill exceeds the average rate of consumption for the eleven months preceding the fill.

If an increase is consumption is the result of a pool leak, the above also applies except the billed rate for consumption of water for a given month must exceed the average eleven month period by twenty percent (20%).

Credits when appropriate, will be applied using the policy set by City Resolution No. 94-22.


How the Wastewater Treatment Process Works

 

The monitoring and control system is run by three linked computers, one each in the plant director's office, the operation's office and the maintenance office. The brains of the system is a central programmable logic controller which makes decisions and starts and stops pumps, opens and closes valves, and communicates with the three computers. Five local control panels are located throughout the facilities. In the unlikely event of an automated system failure, plant staff can continue the operation with manual process controls.

The process begins when wastewater enters the facility by a gravity collection systems and is pumped to the plant's two process lines. Self-cleaning screens remove coarse material such as plastic, rags and chunks of grease. In the grit chamber, the wastewater is aerated and heavy inorganic material, beach sand, rocks, glass, etc., settle out and are removed to a landfill.

 

After grit removal, the wastewater flows to a biological nutrient removal process (A/O - anoxic/oxic). Here, a mass of microscopic plant and animal life uses the organic solids in the wastewater as food.

 

What makes the Cocoa Beach system special is the use of an anoxic zone where a biological mass of organisms splits oxygen away from the nitrate molecule. The process releases nitrogen from the the treated wastewater. In the oxic zones, air bubbles into the mix and is used by the organisms to form a collection of suspended particles or floc. This mass of biosolids moves by gravity to large settling tanks. Here, the floc settles out from the water. The biosolids are continuously removed by pumps to either the anoxic basin or waste digesters. The clear water flows to a series of sand filters for additional clarification. These filters remove the few remaining fine solids prior to the disinfecting step. A chlorine solution is blended with effluent by mechanical mixers. This allows the disinfectant to kill any disease-causing organisms.

 

Near the end of the process, calibrated flow meters measure the amount of wastewater moving through the plant. These flow data are forwarded to the Florida DEEP and EPA as required.

 


Water Reclamation Lab

 

Sampling and testing are necessary for plant operation and fulfilling state and federal legal requirements. The operators of Cocoa Beach's wastewater treatment plant test the influent wastewater for biochemical oxygen demand, pH, chlorine residual, settleable solids, suspended solids, volatile solids, total solids, chlorides, coliform bacteria, phosphates, nitrates and dissolved oxygen, to satisfy operational and public safety needs.

 

 

Since 1989 the reclaimed distribution system's waters have been monitored and analyzed in-house on a monthly basis, for human intestinal viruses. The facility's staff received extensive training at the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta and at the Epidemiological Research Center in Tampa, Florida.

 


Treating What's Left Behind

 

Now what about the biosolids that have been removed from the wastewater? This material also must be treated before it can be returned to a natural setting.

 

This treatment of biosolids has several steps. In large tanks called digesters, the chemicals in the biosolids are stabilized and turned into harmless inert organic matter. A final dewatering step uses belt filters that squeeze water from the solids to produce a cake-like product. The cake is pasteurized with cement kiln dust and quicklime to reduce disease-causing organisms to a level below EPA's standard and to eliminate odor.

 

Everyone knows that recycling benefits the environment. Wastewater treatment plants also understand the importance of recycling. Your Cocoa Beach treatment facility reclaims more that 12 tons per day of safe, high quality, nutrient-rich biosolids which can be sold commercially.

 

In Brevard County, nutrient-rich biosolids are used as farm fertilizer, enrichment of grazing lands and as soil conditioner to enhance sod farm production.

 

 

Biosolids recycling offers a number of benefits to our community

The application of biosolids aids in land reclamation by revitalizing soils that have been stripped of their nutrients.

Biosolids recycling is important in landscaping and forest fertilization efforts in areas that are harvested for lumber.

As organic fertilizer, biosolids products provide nutrient-rich materials used in home and community gardens. Biosolids are also being used in the landscaping for golf courses, public parks and recreation areas.

Biosolids recycling preserves rapidly decreasing landfill space. Their productive use saves limited space for materials that should be placed in a landfill.

And biosolids recycling makes economic sense. In farming, for instance, biosolids recycling has been shown to produce significant improvements in crop growth and yield. Biosolids recycling can be cost-effective complement to chemical fertilizers. Many farmers are supplementing fertilizers that contain inorganic chemicals with biosolids.

 

The increase in biosolids recycling enables local governments to market biosolids products and helps to offset the costs of ensuring clean water quality to their citizens.


Visitors since July 1, 2003